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IJWTB Statistics


First connection vs. Last connection (monthly)

Summary

First Connection

The purpose of this graph is identify periods of growth and decline in unique players.

The blue lines indicate how many unique players have connected to the server for the first time on any given month. For example, roughly 3,000 unique players joined in July 2014.

A larger positive slope indicates that the corresponding month saw an increase in players, while a negative slope shows a decline in growth.


Last Connection

The red lines show how many players have not connected to the server since a given month.

This can be helpful in determining whether player retention is increasing or decreasing.

For example, 3,261 players have not connected back to the server since February 2014.

First connection vs. Last connection (cumulative)

Summary

This graph plots the cumulative number of unique players joining for the first time and players that have not connected back for each month.

From this perspective, it is easier to see the overall trend of player retention.

Summary

Monthly Donations

This graph shows the individual number of donations on a monthly basis. As an example, in July 2014 IJWTB received 15 individual donations.

This represents the number of times any given person donated to IJWTB during that time period, not a total dollar amount donated.

As of July 2015, there have been over 200 separate donations made to IJWTB

Number of Donations (monthly)

Summary

Cumulative Donations

An alternative way of viewing monthly donations is through plotting the cumulative trend over time.

The graph helps distinguish months that received more individual donations than others.

Overall, the positive linear trend shows that IJWTB receives a fairly constant number of donations each month, totalling up to over 300 as of April 2016.

Number of Donations (cumulative)

Team Distribution

Summary

Rank Distribution

This final graph shows the distribution of players and ranks.

It can be observed that the number of players in each rank decreases significantly due to the required hours nearly doubling after each promotion.

A majority of users reside in only the first few ranks, meaning that player retention is relatively low. This is expected, since high retention rates are unrealistic when hundreds of thousands of users are involved.